home for the holidays

tressEveryone is home for Christmas, our four adult children, their spouses and all the grandkids. It’s a houseful, with 16 of us counting Katie and me.

We try to get everyone together every other year, and there are some things you learn. Like that you have to go to the store everyday. This year we even got a second refrigerator. And a couple of extra beds.

But we have a large home, a literal gift from the Lord, and we share it often with others. And it’s especially nice to fill it with those you love most dearly and pray for most earnestly.

We’ve been staying up late playing Dominos as a host of childhood friends flow in and out, along with assorted aunts and uncles, all eager to see the kids and grandkids.

All of them live out of state. Seattle. Tallahassee. Chicago. I’ve only seen the 9-month-old, named after me, once. And before this week I had never seen 8-month-old baby Nathan.

babiesWith our own children, we see the dynamics of their childhood. We see better who they are, with persistent weaknesses and expanding virtues. I like it that they are better at what they are good at—more generous and forgiving and patient.

We home schooled our children, and our kids have spent more time together than most. And their relationships are honest, sometimes confrontational, but solid. I like knowing that if something happens to me they will take care of each other. Or, if necessary, their mom.

We are also finally and slowly getting to know the kind of people they married. And we see them with growing gratitude, thankfully getting to know and appreciate us as well.

The grandchildren are beautiful, of course, even though the two 3-year-olds put up quite a fuss about family pictures.

But we don’t yet know any of them well. The oldest of the seven is just now 7—and we see only glimpses of the particular strengths of each. And the weakness as well. We have no delusions about their fallenness. Or about our own.

But it is a season of joy. And grace. It seems fitting to be surrounded by babies and laughter. And it seems more fitting to be together, bonded by blood and choice, reflecting the depth of love and resting in the mercy of God.

Tabitha, the oldest grandchild, lit the last Advent candle at dinner tonight. I read from I Corinthians 4:6 that we “see the glory of God in the face of Jesus Christ.” And from Romans 5 that “while we were enemies we were reconciled to God.”

On this quiet evening, I pray that this reconciliation, and this glory, will bind us more and more.

And that all my family will see this clearly in the face of Jesus Christ.

Thanks to daughter-in-law Ann Metts for the photos.

Advertisements

About wally metts

Wally Metts is the daysman. He is director of graduate studies in communication at Spring Arbor University and is a pastor at Countryside Bible Church in Jonesville, MI. The father of four adult children, he and his wife Katie raise barn cats and Christmas trees in Michigan. His grandchildren call him Santa.

3 Responses to “home for the holidays”

  1. Thanks for this post, Wally. It captures nicely the family bonding thing. Fir the first time ever I’m celebrating Christmas with my sister. She and her family live in Englewood, Florida and our winter mobile home is there. She is 20 years younger than I, so I was married and in the Marine Corps and stationed on Okinawa when she was born. Barbara and I are blessed to be able to visit her family in Pennsacola, FL and mine here this Christmas season. Praise the Lord for the blessing of family. Keep the victory! Tom

  2. David Martin Stevens Reply December 23, 2012 at 9:34 pm

    Delightful. God bless and honor you all. David & Linnet StevensPsalm 118:24! Date: Mon, 24 Dec 2012 02:01:57 +0000 To: davidmartinstevens@hotmail.com

  3. Wonderful thoughts and indescribable blessings…all that is family is a treasure.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: